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Do I Actually Have Tendinitis?

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The term "tendinitis" is frequently used by injured individuals, family practitioners, and medical specialists. Commonly present in the Achilles, lateral elbow, and rotator cuff tendons, many still believe that there is a large inflammatory component in overuse tendinitis and anti-inflammatory medication can be used to treat this condition.

According to Assistant Professor Khan of the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (2002), "ten of 11 readily available sports medicine texts specifically recommend non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treating painful conditions like Achilles and patellar tendinitis despite the lack of a biological rationale or clinical evidence for this approach."

Patients who present with a painful overuse tendon condition more likely have a non-inflammatory pathology. Studies have revealed that the cause of tendon pain arises from collagen separation. Collagen is the main structural protein found in connec…

Nerve Flossing - Median Nerve Bias

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Begin by placing your left hand on your right shoulder & look away to the opposite side. Abduct the shoulder to 90 degrees and together extend the elbow, wrist and fingers fully. Then turn your head to the right side and release the whole right upper extremity by flexing the fingers, wrist and elbow together. Repeat this again by looking to the opposite side and extending the entire right upper extremity again. Do this for 60 seconds for 3 sets 3 times per day. This exercise is great for mobilizing the connective tissue supporting the nerves in the right upper extremity if you have no acute neurological symptoms. Chronic stiff and tight neck-related upper extremities can be caused by postural dysfunctions (or chronic poor posture), previous whiplash from car accidents, sports traumas or repetitive strain injures to the shoulders, arms, hands or neck.

5 Exercises for Stronger Scapulas

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Weak scapular muscles can lead to an array of injuries including shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tears, and other shoulder-related pains. Pain may be followed by a restricted range of motion and may severely worsen if left untreated. Strengthening the scapular muscles can provide long-term benefits for rehabilitation and performance. Try the five following exercises below:

LYING DUMBBELL PRESS: 1. Lie down flat on a bench with a light dumbbell in each hand.

2. Hold the dumbbells on either side of your chest with the palms facing away from your shoulders and your elbow at a 90 degree angle.

3. Push your arms upwards and feel your shoulder blades separate. Remember to keep the dumbbells parallel to each other until the very top of the press.

3. Inhale and slowly bring down both dumbbells to the sides of your chest until you reach the 90 degree angle at the elbow. Breathe out on your next rep. Perform 3 sets of 10 reps.

WALL PUSHUP: 1. Stand a few steps away from a wall, then place you…

INSYNC PHYSIO in Machu Picchu

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InSync Physiotherapy's Joy Uemoto, RMT, recently returned from her amazing trip to Machu Picchu, Peru:


"We recently got the chance to visit a bit of the beautiful country of Peru. It was such an amazing experience! We got to see alpacas and llamas, and learn how all the beautiful weaving and knitting work is done. Including how they use natural ingredients to create all the colourful dyes. We also got to explore many ruins including beautiful Machu Picchu. Pictures really don't do it justice!"

Check out the the breathtaking photos below:






Top 5 Tips for Hiking

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If you live in beautiful British Columbia or in any other place with mountains and forests, then hiking up to a stunning view of the city is simply inevitable. Regardless of the varying distances and level of difficulty for each location, it is always ideal to be prepared out in the nature. Here are a few tips to get you started and ready for your next big adventure!


Photo: Cailtyn Dunphy at Garibaldi Lake, Physiotherapist, InSync Physiotherapy Tip #1: RESEARCH THE HIKING TRAIL  Know the distance, duration, accessibility, and current conditions of the trail. A particular trail may not be open to the public or might be susceptible to more dangerous conditions during a certain time of the year. Some trails in the Pacific North West are covered with snow well into June-July. Reading reviews made by previous hikers is always helpful in getting first-hand information on what to expect, what equipment to bring, and how to navigate through a difficult trail. Check out https://www.vancouvertra…

5 Effective Exercises for Tennis Elbow

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What is Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)?
Tennis elbow is a widely common soft tissue condition characterized by pain and inflammation on the lateral and outer aspect of the elbow. It is typically due to overuse of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon through repetitive actions such as improperly playing tennis, operating machinery, typing or other gripping activities. Symptoms may include weakness in the arm, stiffness in the elbow, and difficulty performing common hand actions such as holding an object. While ice packs and braces can assist with pain control in the early stages of tennis elbow, improving one's fitness is very important in the long-term management and prevention of this elbow condition. Try these five exercises to strengthen the arm:

BALL SQUEEZE (to improve grip strength) 1) Hold a tennis ball (rolled up sock or towel can also be used) in your hand.
2) Squeeze the ball for 5 seconds and then relax the hand for 10 seconds.
3) Repeat 8 - 12 times for 3 se…

Shoulder Mobility Exercises - Pendular Circles

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This exercise assists in maintaining and increasing mobility in the initial stages of a shoulder injury such as a strain in the rotator cuff or cartilage called the labrum or in persistent stiff shoulder conditions and frozen shoulder. Start by holding onto something for support with your non affected side. In a bent over position, holding for support let the arm of the affected shoulder swing with momentum in a circular motion across the body in a clock wise or counter clock wise direction. Do this for 30 seconds for 3 sets 4-5 times per day.