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Showing posts from January, 2017

Rolling Out the Latissimus Dorsi / Teres Mj

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Place the roller on the ground or your yoga mat and lie on your side below your arm pit. Roll back and forth releasing your latissimus dorsi muscle for up to 2-3 minutes doing 2 sets. Stretching this area with the 1-arm prayer stretch after rolling it out is great for stiff shoulders where the latissimus dorsi muscle can pull down the scapula contributing to shoulder impingement syndrome. Rock climbers, volleyball players, weight lifters and swimmers would benefit greatly with rolling out this muscle!

3 Reasons You Might Be Feeling The 'Pinch' After Training

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Ever find yourself getting an odd pinchy feeling in the front of your hip at the bottom of a squat? That 'can' be caused by the tensor fascia latae (TFL). This muscle runs from the top of your ASIS hipbone, across the hip joint via the iliotibial band. The TFL is primarily a trunk stabilizer; it tries to prevent your torso from moving as the lower body moves. However, the TFL also flexes and abducts the hip, and internally rotates the femur. This is where our problems lie. Inability to activate the glutes can cause overactivity through the hip flexors, quadriceps and especially our friend TFL. Inability to activate the gluteal muscles can stem from a number of possible causes: Inactivity In terms of muscle, the saying “if you don’t use it you lose it” applies. If we don’t create a demand on or stimulate the muscle, it will become smaller and harder to engage. If you’re sitting on your gluts now, squeeze them together. If you can’t get strong, even activation on both sides, g…

5 Tips to Preventing Ski and Snowboarding Injuries

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As the temperatures continue to drop outside, winter sports begin to heat up! Activities, such as skiing and snowboarding, are very popular at all age levels and draw thousands of people to the slopes each year. Although, as health care professionals, we advocate for an active, healthy lifestyle for all, we want to ensure that everyone is active in the safest way possible as to prevent injuries. Winter sport injuries are dominantly traumatic and can be caused by falls, collisions, ski lift accidents and/or dangerous or rough terrain. Some of the most common injuries that are seen are injuries to the knee (ACL and Meniscus tears), injuries to the shoulder (subluxations, dislocations and AC joint sprains), injuries to the head (concussions) and fractures (wrist, hand, finger and ankle). Although some accidents cannot be prevented, below are some tips to minimize your risk of injury. Ensure Proper Instruction If you are new to the world of skiing and snowboarding or haven’t hit the slo…

Hip Rotator - Gluteus Medius Ball Release Segment #4

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Place the release ball on the Gluteus Medius muscle located just below the superior aspect of the pelvic bone called the Iliac crest. Then roll on to the ball and bring your forearm to the floor. Go back and forth with partial weight and then to progress it with full weight on the release ball. Roll it out for up to 3 minutes before stretching. This release technique is great for lower back, sacroiliac and hip joint stiffness, pain and dysfunction.

Flex Those Flexors: 3 Steps To Powerful Hips

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If a few brief hip flexor stretches is your idea of mobility work, you're cutting yourself short. Make hip mobility a priority, and your reward could be a better squat and less back pain! The hip flexors are a group of five muscles that connect the femur (or thigh bone) to the pelvis. They move in one of two ways. When the pelvis is stationary, a contraction of the hip flexors will draw the femur upward—think the classic "goose step." Conversely, if the femur is stationary, a contraction of the hip flexors will tilt the pelvis forward and the butt back. 1. Come Unglued The first step in building better hip flexors is to spend some painful minutes ungluing tissues that have been frozen from years of sitting at a desk. We recommend rolling, aka "self myofascial release." You can roll on just about anything. We've used several different types of foam rollers, a Rumble Roller, lacrosse balls, PVC pipe, a number of weird stick-shaped things. We have found tha…

Hip Flexor “TFL” Muscle Ball Release - Segment 3

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Position the release ball on the Hip Flexor muscle called the “Tensor Fascia Lata”.  Then roll onto the muscle crossing the opposite leg in front of you. Roll slowly back and forth with your body weight on the ball finding that Sweet Spot. Continue rolling for about 2-3 minutes and then switch over to the other side doing 2-3 sets. This release technique can help with tightness of the hip flexor muscles, dysfunction in the sacroiliac joint, lower back, hips or lower back and disc strains.

Piriformis Muscle Self Release Ball Technique - Segment 2

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After finding the piriformis muscle place the release ball onto it. Then straighten the leg and lean over with your weight on the muscle and roll onto it. Roll slowly back and forth on the ball finding that Sweet Spot. Continue rolling for about 2-3 minutes and then switch over to the other side doing 2-3 sets. This release technique can help with tightness or disfunction in the sacroiliac joint, lower back, hips, sciatica.

5 Tips for Running in Sub-Zero Temperatures

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The key to running in the extreme cold is to protect yourself, wear the proper clothing, and have an exit strategy. 1. Dress in Layers You’ve heard this one before. Probably from your mother, who advised you take along your jacket — just in case. Well, you should listen to her. A good approach to running in sub-zero temperatures is to wear a breathable synthetic layer, followed by a second insulating layer, topped off by a wind-proof shell. (synthetic layer, half-zip shirt, shell) On the bottom, consider the same approach in two layers (synthetic layer, tights or pants). 2. Grease Up You’ll be harder to catch than a greased pig in a snowstorm. Smother Vaseline on any exposed skin to offer insulation from the cold and protection from the wind. That means your nose, cheeks, chin, neck, and ear lobes. You’ll be amazed what a layer of this stuff can do. Tip from the pros: If you’re racing in shorts on a cool day, you can coat your hamstrings and other important muscle groups in Vaselin…

Self Release Using Balls Segment 1

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With your knees bent and feet flat on the ground place two release balls together on either side of the lower back. Then lie down with your hands behind your head and neck. A pillow can also be used to support your head & neck even more. Next, lift the buttocks up to increase the pressure contact point on your low back muscles with the balls. Increase the pressure point on one side of the back by leaning on that side and holding for 60 seconds and then switch to the opposite side to release for 60 seconds as well. Then roll your body down-ward to position the balls a little higher on the back muscles. Increase pressure contact points like you did before and repeat in as many back muscle areas as needed. This release ball technique can alleviate tight, stiff or sore muscles in the back. You can do this up to several times per day.

How to Release the Piriformis Muscle

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The piriformis muscle is one of the most irritated spots on a human body. It attaches to the outside of each hip and to your sacrum, the spine’s lowest section. Its job is to turn your leg outward. The major issue for many people is that the sciatic nerve runs through or under the piriformis muscle. If your piriformis is too tight, it can lead to pinching and sciatica-like symptoms in the affected leg. When the piriformis irritates the sciatic nerve, it leads to pain in the buttocks as well as referring pain along the sciatic nerve felt down the back of your thigh or in the lower back. Step 1 Stretch the piriformis. This is the first step in releasing the muscle. Lie on your back. If you need to release the muscle on your right side, bend your right knee, bring it across your body, and point the knee toward your left shoulder. Move the bent knee back to the starting position. Put your hands under your bent knee and bring it to your chest. You will feel a stretch in your buttock regio…