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Showing posts from February, 2017

Low Back Pain - Core Stability Strengthening With Ball

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Begin with tall neutral spine posture and engage the inner core muscles below the belly button. Next come off of your knees & roll out onto your belly on the ball with your hands in front. Keep the inner core muscles engaged and the spine in neutral & then reach one arm up in front with a pistol grip (thumb up) and arm at a slight angle. Hold it for a couple of seconds and repeat again with the same arm just to warm it up a little bit. Then bring the arm up again while extending the opposite heel back and hold for 5 seconds. Repeat this 10 times and then switch to the other arm and opposite leg. Do 3 sets of 10 on each side. You want to feel this one in the Glutes and the inner core below the belly button and not the back muscles as much. This a great strengthening exercise that can help with low back pain.

What is the sciatic nerve?

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6 Stretches for Sciatica Pain Relief Sciatic nerve pain can be so excruciating and debilitating that you don’t even want to get off the couch. Common causes of sciatica can include a ruptured disk, a narrowing of the spine canal called spinal stenosis, and injury. The sciatic nerve runs down the spine and branches off, like a zipper, down the legs. The pain of pressure on the sciatic can feel like sharp shocks running down your leg (generally just one at a time) or nagging lower back pain. Sometimes people experience numbness or tingling in the leg, too. Sciatica pain can occur for a variety of reasons. Identifying ‘what doesn't move’ is the first step toward solving the problem. Often, the most problematic body parts are the lower back and hips. The best way to alleviate most sciatica pain is to do any stretch that can externally rotate the hip to provide some relief. Here are six exercises that do just that. Pigeon pose Pigeon Pose is a common yoga pose. It works to broadly …

4 Tips on How to Improve Your Rock Climbing Ability

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1. Climb More The best thing you can do to get better at rock climbing is to climb more. A lot of newbies often feel they need to build up more strength before they can start rock climbing in earnest, but this is a mistake. If you're really serious about giving rock climbing a go, then don't waste your time pumping iron at a regular gym to "build up your strength" before you hit the rocks. The best way to get better at rock climbing is to climb. It is really as simple as that.
Pumping iron might be useful at a later stage but it won't do you much good at the start. Plenty of buff guys coming into the rock climbing gym can't climb to save their lives. If you wanted to get stronger, you should do it by climbing more, not swapping out your climbing sessions with regular weight training sessions. Why? Because weight training is symmetrical. When you do a lat pull down, you pull equally with both arms. You don't use your legs to help you and you certainly don…

Rolling Out Your Calf Muscles

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Put the roller on the ground and bring your calf onto it. Roll up and down onto your calf while supporting yourself with both hands. Find the sweet spots (or the spots that hurt in a good way) and continue to roll over these areas for 3 minutes in total. Do this 2-3 times per day just before you stretch out your calves. This technique is great as a cool down in running, any sports involving running, or after swimming and rock climbing. It’s great for chronic calf strains & tightness associated with knee, ankle injuries or plantar fasciitis.

Rolling Out Your Hamstring Muscles

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Put the roller on the ground and bring your hamstring onto it. Roll up and down onto your Hamstring muscle while supporting yourself with both hands. Find the sweet spots (or the areas that hurt in a good way) and continue to roll over these areas for 3-4 minutes in total. Do this 2-3 times a day just before you stretch out the hamstring. This technique is great as a cool down in any sports involving running, or after swimming & rock climbing. It’s great for old chronic hamstring strains & chronic tightness caused by knee, hip, pelvis or back injuries.

7 Ways to Tell if You Have a Psoas Muscle Imbalance

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When you have a tight (or short) psoas muscle, you may experience pain in your lower back or in your hips, especially when lifting your legs. This is caused by the muscle compressing the discs in the lumbar region of your back. Stretching your muscles and releasing the tension on the psoas is the best way to prevent this from happening. It takes time and daily attention to keep your psoas muscles relaxed, stretched, and strong. And, while most people with psoas issues have tight psoas muscles, there are some people whose psoas muscles can be overstretched. In this case, if you stretch your psoas and it is already overstretched, you will cause more problems. Your body will tell you what your psoas ultimately needs. Here are 7 ways to tell if you have a psoas muscle imbalance: Leg length discrepancy A tight psoas muscle can cause your pelvis to rotate forward. This in turn can cause an an internal rotation of your leg on the affected side. The opposite leg will rotate external…

6 Stretches for Sciatica Pain Relief

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What is the sciatic nerve? Sciatic nerve pain can be so excruciating and debilitating that you don’t even want to get off the couch. Common causes of sciatica can include a ruptured disk, a narrowing of the spine canal called spinal stenosis, and injury. The sciatic nerve runs down the spine and branches off, like a zipper, down the legs. The pain of pressure on the sciatic can feel like sharp shocks running down your leg (generally just one at a time) or nagging lower back pain. Sometimes people experience numbness or tingling in the leg, too. Sciatica pain can occur for a variety of reasons. Identifying ‘what doesn't move’ is the first step toward solving the problem. Often, the most problematic body parts are the lower back and hips. The best way to alleviate most sciatica pain is to do “any stretch that can externally rotate the hip to provide some relief.” Here are six exercises that do just that. Pigeon pose Pigeon Pose is a common yoga pose. It works to broadly open the…

Rolling Out the Ilio-Tibial Band (IT-Band)

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Place the roller on the ground or your yoga mat and put your lateral thigh onto the roller. Gently roll up and down onto your IT-Band controlling the amount of pressure onto it with your hands. Find the sweet spot and continue to roll over onto this area for up to 3-4 minutes total. Do this 2 to 3 times per day. This self release technique is great for IT-Band syndrome caused by knee sprains, tight lateral quads, lateral tracking of the knee cap or any other acute or chronic knee pain.