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Quick Recovery for Finger Sprains

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Finger sprains commonly occur in sports and every day activities that involve heavy lifting or repetitive hand motions. Falls or contact sports such as football may even force a finger out of its normal joint position resulting in a dislocation. The force to the finger may cause joints in the finger to hyperextend or move sideways. Sprains of the finger are classified according to the extent of injury or damage.

Classification:1) Grade I - Mild: A first degree sprained finger is present when the ligaments are only stretched but not ruptured. There may be localized swelling, slight pain, and slight reduction in range of motion, but strength remains unaffected. An individual may continue to engage in an activity. Taping of the injured finger may be more effective. Recovery is immediate.

2) Grade II - Moderate: A second degree sprained finger occurs when there is partial ligament tears, a greater reduction in range of motion and some loss of strength with more swelling and pain. The join…

Low Back Pain: Gluteus Medius Pressure Point Ball Release

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Place the release ball on the Gluteus Medius muscle located just below the superior aspect of the pelvic bone called the Iliac crest. Then roll on to the ball and bring your forearm to the ground. Go back and forth with partial weight and then to progress it with full weight on the release ball. Roll it out for up to 3 minutes before stretching. Following up with the Hip Rotation stretches after doing this ball release technique can help with your lower back pain. If you have any pain you are not sure about while doing this exercise, consult your Physio before continuing.

Rotator Cuff Strain: Big Ball Reach Outs

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Keep your posture tall and your inner core engaged by pulling the muscles below the belly button inwards toward the spine. Wrap a resistance band around your upper back. With your belly on the the ball stay on your hands and feet. Secure the band on the floor with your opposite hand. Reach your index finger forward, with the thumb up towards the wall on a slight angle out, then come back down. Repeat this 10 times for 3 sets on each side. To progress the functional core strength, reach your index finger forward while extending your opposite leg and heel back at the same time. Keep the hips and pelvis level. Repeat this 10 times for 3 sets on each side. It’s very important to retrain your core strength in conjunction with the rehab of your rotator cuff strain to have a more successful recovery! This is a great functional exercise to help you get back into many sports such as rock climbing, Ultimate Frisbee, Volley Ball, Basketball or Swimming.

7 Easy Exercises with a Towel

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Home exercising can be just as effective as going to the gym by using household items such as a medium-sized towel. Check out the exercises below for a full body work-out:

1) Plank Walks:  In a plank position with a towel under both feet and maintaining a neutral spine, walk forwards by placing one hand in front of the other for 10 to 20 steps.

2) Neck Rotation:  Find where the hairline ends to locate a noticeable "bump" on the back of your neck. This is the spinous process for your 2nd cervical vertebrae. Place the edge of an unrolled towel on this spot, then cross your hands over, making sure the top hand is on the same side as the direction of rotation (e.g. right arm will pull towel downwards towards the middle of the chest if you are turning LEFT). Complete a pain-free rotation 3 times in each direction per day.

3) Knee Tucks:  Start in a plank position with a towel under both feet and keep a neutral spine, then engage the lower abs below the belly button to pull the kn…

Ankle Sprain: Strengthening Stabilizer Muscles

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It’s generally good to get your ankle moving after you’ve sprained it. How much time you wait depends on whether how bad you sprained it with the amount of swelling you have, whether you can weight bear on it or if there’s a fracture involved . If you’re unsure, consult your local Physiotherapist before doing this exercise. This exercise works the Peroneal muscles that help to stabilize the ankle. Start by wrapping a resistance band around the forefoot with the lower legs supported by either a rolled up towel or folded Yoga Mat so that the heels are up from the floor. Place a small squishy ball between the knees and maintain a squeeze on the ball throughout the exercise. This helps you isolate the movement focus towards the ankles and prevents the hip and thighs from being involved. To strengthen the left lateral ankle, keep the right ankle stiff to stabilize. keep the ankle plantar flexed, so toes pointed down, and move the foot outwards lead by the little toe. Do 3 sets of 10 to 15 …

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Wall Squat Core Activation

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This exercise can help with Sacro Iliac joint pain that can be caused by hyper mobility or instability due to strained ligaments from repetitive strain or acute trauma. If you experience pain or you’re unsure about this exercise please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. Wrap a closed loop resistance band around the thighs just above the knees. Then position yourself so that your low back is fully leaning up against the big ball on the wall. Keep your posture nice and tall but don’t arch your low back when leaning upright against the big ball. Next, engage you inner core stabilizers by contracting your pelvic floor muscles and pulling your transverse abdominal muscles below your belly button inwards, hugging your spine. Remember to keep breathing. Leaning your weight on the ball slide downwards doing a wall squat while you maintain static isometric pressure against the resistance bands. Keep your knees over your ankles and in alignment with your second toes. Hold the…

5 Strengthening Exercises for Dancers

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Overuse injuries are commonly found in dancers due to their intense training regimes. Nearly 60 to 90% of dancers experience an injury or multiple injuries during their careers (Steinberg, Siev-Ner, Peleg, et al., 2013). These injuries include chrondromalacia patella ("runner's knee"), Achilles tendinopathy, and metatarsal (foot) fractures. Some major causes of injury may be due to anatomic structure, genetics, training regime, improper technique, floor surfaces, age, body mass index, muscle imbalance, nutrition, and menstrual function (Steinberg et al., 2013).



Dance typically includes being on the toes and forefoot in a extreme plantar flexion position, known as "en pointe." Individuals with poor balance and landing techniques will experience higher ground reaction forces which may subsequently strain the back, knees, and ankles. Incorrect form in many non-professional dancers entail a valgus knee position (knees caved inwards) and hip adduction. Conversely, …