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Showing posts from January, 2018

Effects of Energy Deficiency on Performance

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What is the "Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) Syndrome?"
The RED-S syndrome refers to impaired physiological functioning caused by relative energy deficiency and may result in impairments in menstrual function, metabolic rate, bone health, immunity, immunity, or cardiovascular health.
Energy availability (EA) is calculated as energy intake (EI) minus the energy cost of exercise (EE) relative to fat-free mass (FFM). In healthy adults, an energy balance is a value of 45 kcal/kg FFM/day.
Low energy availability is where an individual’s dietary energy intake is insuffient to support the energy expenditure required for health and daily living. It may occur in individuals who are required to diet to enhance performance, are pressured to lose weight, go through frequent weight cycling, overtrain, have recurrent and non-healing injuries, or strict regulations.
What happens if I have low energy?
As seen in the figure above, having low energy availability for your body can res…

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 13 - “ Split Squat Jumps”

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Start with a nice tall posture and your inner core pulled in to keep your low back flat. Engage your back leg into extension by pushing the back forefoot into a solid bench or a chair supported against a wall. With your arms in the ready position bend the knee to 90 degrees by bringing the butt down and then jump back up. Keep your thigh strong by preventing the knee from buckling inwards. Keep your knee over the heel and don’t let it go over your toes. Do 3 sets of 10 on each side. Split squat jumps is a progression of the split squats. It will help you develop more dynamic strength in your and thighs and hips to keep your knee strong and protect you from ACL knee ligament injuries.

 Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 12 - “ Split Squats”

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Start with a nice tall posture and your inner core pulled in to keep your low back flat. Engage your back leg into extension by pushing the back forefoot into a solid bench or a chair supported against a wall. With your arms in the ready position bend the knee to 90 degrees by bringing the butt down. Keep your thigh strong by preventing the knee from buckling inwards. Keep your knee over the heel and don’t let it go over your toes. Do 3 sets of 10 on each side. Split squats will help you develop more strength in your and thighs and hips to keep your knee strong and protect you from ACL knee ligament injuries. It’s also great for post ACL knee surgery rehab!

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 11 “Advanced Superman Deadlifts”

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These are the advanced Superman Deadlifts. This is progressive strengthening for your core with your Hamstrings as well as your Glute muscles. This will help you get stronger to protect your ACL ligament in your knee and for post-ACL surgery and rehab. Start by holding on to a 5 pound dumbbell on the same side as the leg that you are going to extend back on. With nice tall posture, engage your core below the belly button. Keeping your spine flat, bend forward at the hips while you extend the leg back and reaching forward with the opposite arm and holding onto the 5 pound dumbbell with the other hand. Remember to keep that hip down on the side you’re extending the leg back on. Do 3 sets, 10 repetitions, holding for 3 seconds.

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 10 - “Superman Deadlifts”

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So these are the Superman Deadlifts. In the Superman deadlifts we’re working on strengthening up the core with your glutes and also with your hamstrings. So this is going to be really great to help you work on your pre-season training by getting those hamstrings strong, especially to protect that ACL and to also post-ACL surgery and rehab. You’re going to start off with nice tall posture. Then engage that core for me. And you’re going to want to try and maintain this position the whole time with your spine. And then you’re going to come up on one leg. Great! And you also want to try to keep a bit of a knee bend because when you go down with your body and reach out, you’re going to straighten out the knee. Good! And then other thing is that you want to keep this hip down… Good. And reach forward and kick back with your heel, and come back. Good… and again. That’s it. Keep that hip down. Kick with that heel. Good. And Back. And Again. Good and just kick this down and yeah get the glutes…

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 9 - “Plank Walk-outs”

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Start by pulling in your inner core by making your waistline skinnier below the belly button. Then roll out into a plank position on the ball in full control with a flat spine. Lift one leg off of the ball with full control while keeping your hips level with each other. Try to keep you toes pointed to the floor as much as possible and lead with your heal. Do 3 sets of 5 repetitions holding for 5 seconds on each side to start. Then progress to 3 sets of 5-10 repetitions holding for 10 seconds when stronger. Plank walk-outs on a ball is great for strengthening your core in coordination with strengthening your posterior hip and gluteal muscles.

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 8 - “Advanced Hamstring Curl”

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Lie on the ground with the stability ball under your heels with your legs straight and your toes pointing up. Engage your inner core muscles below the belly button. Then extend your hips by squeezing your butt and lifting it off the ground. Bring one knee towards your chest and hold it there. Then bring the ball in towards you by flexing your other knee and then straightening it back to the start position. Keep your inner core engaged the entire time. Do 3 sets of 15 repetitions, 3 times per week. This exercise is a progression of the Bridging Hamstring Curl that you just did in the last segment in Knee ACL ligament Injury Prevention. It’s great for advanced strengthening of the hamstring muscles along with your glutes and core stability muscles to help protect your ACL knee ligament."

How to Avoid Gastrointestinal Problems During Exercise

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What should I eat or drink when exercising?
Many gastrointestinal (GI) problems can occur even if one trys to avoid eating before or during exercise. Studies suggest that approximately 30-50% of athletes experience some type of gastrointestinal issue that can impair performance and delay recovery. The three main causes of GI problems:1) Physiological 2) Mechanical 3) Nutritional
During intense exercise, especially when dehydrated, blood flow to the intestines is reduced. This is believed to be one of the main factors leading to the development of GI symptoms. General Symptoms: nauseavomitingabdominal anginabloody diarrheaother abdominal symptoms (from mild discomfort to sever ischemic colitis)Classification of Symptoms:1) Lower GI Tract 2) Upper GI Tract

Runners tend to experience lower GI tract symptoms such as flatulence (excessive gas), diarrhea, or urgency due to the repetitive impact and reduced blood flow to the gut. On the other hand, cyclists may experience upper GI tract symptomsdue t…

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 7 - “Bridging Hamstring Curl”

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Lie on the ground with the stability ball under your heels with your legs straight and your toes pointing up. Engage your inner core muscles below the belly button. Then extend your hips by squeezing your butt and lifting it off the ground. Then bring the ball in towards you by flexing your knees and hold for a second and then straighten your legs back to the start position while keeping your butt up and hips extended. Keep your inner core engaged the entire time. Start by doing 3 sets of 10 repetitions and then progressing it to 3 sets of 15 to 20 repetition 4 times per week. This is great for strengthening the hamstring muscles along with your glutes and core stability muscles to help protect your ACL knee ligament."

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 6 - Lateral Bound Hops

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Starting with tall posture, engage your core muscles below the belly button by drawing the lower ab muscles inward toward the spine. Avoid arching the low back. With arms in a ready position do a lateral hop pushing off on one leg and landing on the opposite leg with an emphasis on your body weight over your foot when landing. This is great for strengthening your muscles and developing dynamic balance control to stabilize your knee during lateral movements to protect your ACL knee ligament when playing! To add variety, you can do lateral bound hops to different angles and back again. Do 3 sets, 10 to 15 repetitions to start. Progress the exercise by increasing it up to 25 repetitions to advance.

Knee ACL Ligament Injury Prevention: Ultimate Frisbee Training Part 5-Hand Grid Balance

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This exercise can be done standing onto of a soft foam pad or the cushion of your couch. Starting with tall posture, engage your core muscles below the belly button by drawing the lower ab muscles inward toward the spine. Using one hand, hold the butt end of a 3 pound dumbbell. Then bend down to touch the dumbbell to the floor at the 3 O’Clock position like a grid on a clock. Come back up and then bend down to touch the dumbbell at the 2 O’Clock position. Repeat this until you get to the 9 O’Clock position and then reverse coming back to the 3 O’Clock position. Do 3 sets 3 times a day. This is great for developing strength, balance, and proprioceptive control to stabilize your lower extremity and help protect your knee from ACL ligament injuries!

Exercising in the Cold

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With the temperature getting closer to 0°C, many factors including the environment, clothing, body composition, nutrition, age, and exercise intensity in the cold may elicit additional physiologic strain or injury risk beyond that associated with regular conditions. An individual’s core temperature may drop and contribute to hypothermia, frostbite, or diminished exercise capability. Care must be taken into wearing proper clothing and footwear to minimize cold stress to the body or slippage.
Clothing Considerations:1) Three layers: a.inner layer such as lightweight polyester or polypropylene b.middle layer such as polyester fleece or wool c.outer layer to transfer moisture to the air and repel wind or rain 2) Protect your head, hands, feet, and ears 3) Adjust insulation to minimize sweating 4) Use clothing vents to reduce sweat accumulation 5) Do not wear an outer layer unless rainy or windy 6) Reduce clothing insulation as exercise intensity increases Exercise tips:1) Check the forecast before …