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Showing posts from May, 2018

INSYNC PHYSIO's Jenn Lam in Thailand!

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Insync Physiotherapy's Jenn Lam, RMT, recently returned from amazing trip to Thailand! Check out the photos below:

Pictured above: Here is Jenn feeding an elephant at the Elephant Sanctuary where she also got to walk and bathe the rescued animals from the riding facilities in Bangkok
 Pictured above: Temple Wat Arun along the Chaopraya River in Bangkok
Pictured above: Famous Taiwanese shampoo massage where the hair stylists got to put Jenn's hair into funny styles!
Pictured above: Beach in Rawai, Phuket

Lower Back Treatment: 1-Legged Squat

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Starting with tall posture, engage your core muscles below the belly button by drawing the lower abs inwards toward the spine. Avoid arching the low back. With arms in a ready position do a one-legged squat with your body weight distributed equally over the foot. Don’t go any lower than a ninety degree bend in the knees, keeping your knees in alignment with your second toe and over your heel as much as possible. Hold for a good long second and then straighten back up with your butt muscles to the start. Do three sets of 10 repetitions daily. The one-legged squat is a great exercise that’s effective in strengthening the quad and posterior hip muscles with the core and balance and proprioception to help further strengthen the lower back. The key is to keep your inner core low back stabilizing muscles engaged by making yourself skinnier at the waistline while you keep breathing. This will help you build increasingly higher level of low back core strength with your thighs and legs. 

Lower Back Treatment: 2-legged Squat

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Starting with tall posture, engage your core below the belly button by drawing the inner core muscles toward the spine without arching the low back. With arms in a ready position do a two legged squat with your body weight distributed equally over both feet. Stay in Spine neutral. Don’t go any lower than a ninety degree bend in the knees, keeping your knees in alignment with your second toe and over your heels as much as possible. Hold for a good long second and then straighten back up with your butt muscles to the start. Do three sets of ten repetitions daily. The two legged squat is a great exercise for strengthening the quad and posterior hip muscles with the core to help strengthen the lower back. The key is to keep your inner core low back stabilizing muscles engaged by making yourself skinnier at the waistline while you keep breathing. This will help you build more low back core strength with your thighs and legs.

How to Prevent Elbow Injuries in Young Throwers

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Recent research has shown that nearly 40% of 7 to 18 year old baseball players endure elbow and shoulder pain during their baseball season. Nearly half of these injured players report their ongoing participation despite having pain. A recent epidemiological study of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries in athletes 17 to 20 years old reported the number of UCL reconstructions has increased dramatically for this age group. Early education and detection of elbow injuries in throwing sports may help reduce the number of overuse injuries from developing.

Symptoms "Little league elbow," or known as medial epicondyle apophysitis, is most commonly found in young throwers. Sports such as baseball, softball, tennis, or golf, can result in this overuse injury to the growth plate on the inside of the elbow. Repeated stress to the growth plates may cause inflammation and lead to pain or swelling. Serious injury may even result in separation of the growth plate from the rest of the bo…

Shoulder Impingement Pain: Rotator Cuff Eccentric Strengthening

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Shoulder Impingement pain can be caused by muscle imbalances in the Shoulder Complex. Weak and shortened external rotator cuff muscles can be one of the contributing factors to this problem. When the Rotator cuff is strong and activates properly, it dynamically stabilizes the shoulder joint and allows for proper biomechanics to occur. To strengthen the external rotator cuff muscles position your elbow by your side, shoulders relaxed and your posture in spine neutral. Holding on to a resistance band use your other hand to help it out to the end range of external rotation. The opposite hand is doing all the work pushing the band outward that is being held by your other hand. Then let the hand holding the band slowly return to the start position. This is called Eccentric Strengthening because you’re strengthening the rotator cuff with a lengthening movement of the muscles. Repeat this for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets daily.

Shoulder Pain: Posterior Deltoid and Capsule Stretch

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Shoulder pain can be caused by many things going on with the shoulder complex. One of the things that can cause shoulder pain is an impingement problem of the rotator cuff due to a tight posterior deltoid muscle or posterior shoulder capsule. To stretch this out find the angle that it is most tight in the back side. Then, lean your shoulder blade firmly against a wall to stabilize the shoulder blade to isolate the stretch. It’s important to place your shoulder blade firmly against the wall to stabilize it. Otherwise, the stretch will be more into your rhomboid muscles on the inside of the shoulder blade. Gently pull the arm across the body and hold this stretch for 30 seconds. Repeat this for 3 sets.

INSYNC PHYSIO's Michelle Robichaud in Northern Europe

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Insync Physiotherapy's Michelle Robichaud, RMT, recently returned from her amazing trip to Northern Europe and back in time for the 2018 BMO Vancouver Marathon where she completed an 8-km run! Congrats Michelle!


Check out the photos below of Michelle in Iceland, Scotland, and Denmark:




Back Pain Treatment - Core strength with Hip Extension

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This exercise can help treat weakness from acute or chronic back pain. On your hands and knees in 4-point position, engage your inner core by pulling the Transverse Abdominal muscles below the belly button inwards towards your spine while keeping your low back flat. Extend the thigh with a bent knee and make sure the pelvis stays level. Hold it for a few seconds and then bring it back down. Repeat this for 10 repetitions for 3 sets on each side. Your ability to engage your inner core muscles and isolate hip extension without extending and arching the lower back is the key to doing this exercise successfully. If you have any increase in pain or unsure about how to do this exercise, consult your local physiotherapist before hand.

Building a Stronger Core to Prevent Low Back Pain

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Up to 80% of individuals will experience some lower back pain at least once in their lifetime. Lower back pain (LBP) results in high costs and places a burden on society. These costs include diagnostic, treatment, and indirect costs associated with work disability. A number of conditions can lead to low back pain such as infections, tumours, fractures or dislocations of the spine. However, lifting heavy loads is generally thought to be a key predictor of LBP. An important element in prevention of LBP is to correctly stabilize the trunk during lifting by pre-activating the abdominal wall muscles. By doing so, the spine will increase in stiffness to reduce the effect of undesired spinal perturbations. Exercises aimed at bracing the abdominal muscles may reduce the risk of LBP.
There are two ways of stabilizing the abdominal muscles: an abdominal hollow or abdominal brace. An abdominal hollow begins by drawing in the lower abdomen (transversus abdominus) while maintaining relaxation of …

Back Pain, Lower Back Treatment “Building Core Strength”

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Lie on the ground with the stability ball under your heels with your legs straight and your toes pointing up. Engage your inner core muscles below the belly button. Then extend your hips by squeezing your butt and lifting it off the ground. Then bring the ball in towards you by flexing your knees and hold for a second and then straighten your legs back to the start position while keeping your butt up and hips extended. Keep your inner core engaged the entire time. Start by doing 3 sets of 10 repetitions and then progressing it to 3 sets of 15 to 20 repetition 4 times per week. This is great for building core stability to keep your low back strong when you have chronic back pain. If you are experiencing acute low back pain or unsure please consult your Physiotherapist before doing this exercise.

Shoulder Tendinitis & Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: 4-Point Plank Walk-Out

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Shoulder Tendinitis and Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy can cause a lot of muscle imbalances to occur at the shoulder complex. These imbalances can affect the optimal movement in the shoulder and delay your functional recovery. The four point plank walk out helps retrain important muscle activation patterns for a better functional recovery. Position yourself in plank position with supine neutral. It’s important to make sure your inner core is engaged and that you stay in spine neutral throughout this exercise. Start by walking the hand and foot out to one side,then back to the centre, and then to the other side, and back to the centre again. Put full equal weight each time you place your hand and foot down. Repeat this for 30 seconds 3 sets 2 times daily. If you have any pain or unsure if this is the right exercise for you, consult your local Physiotherapist before doing this exercise.

Shoulder Pain and Rotator Cuff Tear: 4-Point Walk-Out

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A rotator cuff tear can cause a lot of muscle imbalances to occur at the shoulder complex. These imbalances can affect the optimal movement in the shoulder and delay your functional recovery. The four point walk out helps to retrain the muscle activation in the shoulder blade to work together with your rotator cuff muscles for a better functional recovery. Place your hands and knees in a four point position in neutral supine. It’s important to make sure your inner core is engaged and that your spine is in neutral posture throughout this exercise. Start by walking one hand out to one side, then back to the centre, and then to the other side, and back to the centre again. Put full equal weight each time you place your hand down. Repeat this for 30 seconds 3 sets 2 times daily. If you have any pain or unsure if this is the right exercise for you, consult your local Physiotherapist before doing this exercise.

How to Recover from Achilles Tendinopathy

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The Achilles tendon is the thickest tendon in the human body. It attaches the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (together known as the triceps surae) as well as the plantaris muscle to the calcaneus bone (heel) of the ankle. These muscles combined allow for plantar flexion at the ankle and flexion of the knee.

Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon refers to a condition that causes pain, swelling, or stiffness at the tendon connecting the muscles to the bone. Commonly found in athletes such as runners, overuse of the tendon, may result in microtrauma or repeated injuries to the Achilles tendon. Wearing improper footwear, having poor training or exercising techniques, making a sudden change to your training program, or exercising on hard surfaces may also cause minor injuries to this tendon. Pain and stiffness may develop gradually and are typically worse in the morning. Pain is generally worse after exercise, but may potentially arise during training. Overtime, symptoms may be so severe …

Ankle Injuries & Ankle Sprains: Gluteus Muscle Retraining

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This exercise is great for retraining your Gluteus Medius after an ankle injury. After you sprain your ankle, the muscles all the way up into the hip on the affected side can be affected. Begin by lying on your left side to strengthen your left Gluteus Medius “Butt” muscles. Keep your right hip stacked on top of your left hip and place your right hand on your right hip. Then bring your right foot on the ground in front of your left knee and bend the left knee to 90 degrees to stabilize yourself a little more. Next, bring your left foot up, while maintaining the ninety degree bend in your knee. Hold this for 10 seconds. Do 3 sets of 10 repetitions daily.