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Showing posts from June, 2018

5 Strengthening Exercises for Dancers

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Overuse injuries are commonly found in dancers due to their intense training regimes. Nearly 60 to 90% of dancers experience an injury or multiple injuries during their careers (Steinberg, Siev-Ner, Peleg, et al., 2013). These injuries include chrondromalacia patella ("runner's knee"), Achilles tendinopathy, and metatarsal (foot) fractures. Some major causes of injury may be due to anatomic structure, genetics, training regime, improper technique, floor surfaces, age, body mass index, muscle imbalance, nutrition, and menstrual function (Steinberg et al., 2013).



Dance typically includes being on the toes and forefoot in a extreme plantar flexion position, known as "en pointe." Individuals with poor balance and landing techniques will experience higher ground reaction forces which may subsequently strain the back, knees, and ankles. Incorrect form in many non-professional dancers entail a valgus knee position (knees caved inwards) and hip adduction. Conversely, …

Low Back Pain: Gluteus Medius Strengthening vs Wall

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This simple exercise works the gluteus medius muscle of your hip if it’s really weak! Start by leaning your forearm into the wall and have your outside hip flared out. With your inner core engaged and your posture tall flex your inside knee up to your chest . Start by squeezing the outside hip in and drive across to the other hip and upwards. Bring the outside hip in line with the knee and foot below. Then release and drop your hip back out and repeat. Do 10 repetitions for 3 sets. This is a close-chain exercise to strengthen the Gluteus Medius Muscle which can dynamically stabilize your hip and pelvis and help decrease low back pain when doing weight bearing activities like running, any running sports or even walking and hiking.

How to Improve Flexibility with a Yoga Block

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Flexibility is the ability to move a joint through its complete range of motion and is important in carrying out daily activities and in athletic performance. Maintaining flexibility of all joints produce efficient movement and reduces risk of injury. It can be improved in all age groups by regularly engaging in exercises targeting different joints. Joint capsule stiffness, muscle viscosity, ligament and tendon compliance all affect flexibility. Therefore, adequate warm-up and proper stretching is essential in optimizing joint range of motion. Chronic conditions such as lower back pain may arise if an individual has poor lower back and hip flexibility, in conjunction with weak abdominal muscles.

Flexibility exercises are most effective through warm-up exercises or passively through moist heat packs or hot baths to increase the muscle temperature. An effective warm-up is typically 5 to 10 minutes long, but may be longer for older adults or individuals with health conditions. Watch the…

Low Back Pain - Gluteus Medius Strengthening

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Do you have lower Back Pain? You may have weakness in your glute med muscle! This exercise is great for strengthening that and help support your low back. Begin by lying on your left side to strengthen your left Gluteus medius “Butt” muscles. Keep your right hip stacked on top of your left and place your right hand on your right hip. Then bring your right foot on the ground in front of your left knee and bend the left knee to 90 degrees. Bring your left foot up, while maintaining the ninety degree bend in your knee. Hold this for 10 seconds; Do 3 sets of 10 repetitions.

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Gluteus Medius vs Ball

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This is a great functional exercise for the Gluteus Medius Muscle in your hips. It helps to stabilize your sacroiliac joint when walking, hiking, running , and any running sports that involve cutting like soccer, football or ultimate frisbee. Lean your inside hip onto the exercise ball against the wall. With your inner core engaged and your posture tall flex your inside knee up to your chest. Start by driving your outside hip into the ball to bring the inside hip upwards so it’s level with your other hip.. Then release and drop your inside hip back down and repeat. Do 10 repetitions for 3 sets. This exercise should not produce any pain. If it does please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Gluteus Medius vs Wall

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This simple exercise works the gluteus medius muscle of your hip if it’s really weak! Start by leaning your forearm into the wall and have your outside hip flared out. With your inner core engaged and your posture tall flex your inside knee up to your chest . Start by squeezing the outside hip in and drive across to the other hip and upwards. Bring the outside hip in line with the knee and foot below. Then release and drop your hip back out and repeat. Do 10 repetitions for 3 sets. This is a close-chain exercise for the Gluteus Medius Muscle and helps to prevent your hip from flaring out and stabilizes your sacro iliac joint when do weight bearing activities like running , any running sports or even walking and hiking.

How to Reduce Interscapular Pain

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Persistent pain between the shoulder pains, or interscapular pain, may arise from a number of varying causes. The scapula is the bone that connects the humerus (upper arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone) on either side of the body. The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus, all of which make up the rotator cuff. The major muscles surrounding the scapula that make up the interscapular region include the rhomboids, trapezius, and levator scapulae.
The rhomboids are two quadrate-shaped muscles that originate from the lower cervical vertebrae and upper thoracic vertebrae and attach to the medial border of the scapula. The rhomboids work to retract and rotate the scapula downwards. The trapezius muscle extend from the occipital bone of the skull to the lower thoracic vertebrae and attach to the scapular spine. Its action is to elevate and rotate the scapula upwards. Likewise, the levator scapulae run from the upper c…

Rotator Cuff Strain

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This exercise is great for rehabbing from a rotator cuff strain or shoulder impingement strain. Wrap a mild resistive elastic band half way down the mid back, and then cross it over at the front and securely wrap both ends onto each hand. Turn facing a wall and place your pinky finger and edge of hand firmly against it. Keep your posture tall and inner core engaged while pushing your hands against the wall up to the ceiling in “V” formation and externally rotate the hands out, holding it at the top for a good long second. Then slowly bring it back down. Repeat this 10 to 15 repetitions for 3 sets. By keeping your inner core engaged and your posture tight, this exercise is great for rebuilding the shoulder strength you need in any overhead reaching sports, especially rock climbing, volleyball, and basket ball. You should not have any pain when doing this exercise. If you do experience pain please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Shoulder Impingement Pain and Rotator Cuff Strain

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This exercise is great for strengthening the rotator cuff in conjunction with the rest of the shoulder complex muscles after recovering from an impingement or rotator cuff strain. Loop a closed elastic band with mild resistance around your arms above your wrists. Kneeling on the ground, keep your spine in neutral posture with your inner core muscles engaged. Imagine there is clock face numbered 9 to 3 O’clock on the ground in front of you. Begin by reaching the right hand to 12 O’clock and then back to the start position. Proceed to continue to 1 O’clock, 2 O’clock, 3 O’clock and then backwards up to 12 O’clock again. Then do the same with your left hand to 12 O’Clock until you reach 9 O’clock and reverse back to 12 O’clock again. That’s 1 complete repetition. Do 5 repetitions for 3 sets. This exercise should not produce any pain. If it does please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Which is Better for an Injury: Ice or Heat?

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Ever wondered whether to use ice or heat for your sore muscles, your healing fracture, or any injury? Both ice and heat have been commonly used to treat an array of injuries, but when to use either one is critical in preventing further damage and promoting faster recovery.


Acute irritation or inflammation of a muscle, ligament, or tendon is typically treated with ice. The cold application reduces inflammation and numbs the pain, especially when the superficial tissues are red, hot, and swollen. The inflammatory response associated with damage to tissues is a defence mechanism in the human body that lasts for the first several days to protect against infection. The response involves immediate changes to blood flow, increased permeability of blood vessels, and flow of white blood cells to the affected site.

ICE APPLICATIONIce can be used for gout flare-ups, headaches, sprains, and strains. It is crucial to apply ice to the site of injury during the first 48 hours post-injury to minimize…

Vancouver Physiotherapist: Sharing her Why, Nadine Stunzi

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So Nadine, tell us…What do you like most about being a Physiotherapist?” What I love most about being a Physiotherapist is that I feel like we actually have an amazing capacity to create a lot of impact in the health care system. We get a fair amount of time with patients at a high frequency, coupling that with our vast clinical knowledge in our commitment to life long learning, I really feel and have noticed in patient outcomes that we can create a lot of meaningful change in patients’ lives… not just in terms in their functional well being but also in terms of their emotional well being as well. “Great.. And why did you become a physiotherapist?” Why?! I think why is a beautiful question that’s really important to ask behind a lot of what we do. You should be ground in that. Three and a half years of my life I spent being a personal trainer and I loved it! I loved working with the powerful tools of exercise and creating change and I loved the relationships that I built, but I wanted…

Shoulder Impingement Pain

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Ok! So today we’re going to do some “Kettle Bell Rotates”, and this is really great for the rotator cuff in conjunction with strengthening the scapular muscles. And so what we’re going to start off with… Iyad’s got a kettle bell; And so the reason why a kettle bell is actually better is because with a dumbbell the weight is kind of on the side and with a kettle bell the weight is actually going straight down right through the forearm. So we’re going to start off basically holding a… so this is a 10 pounder here so it’s a little more as you get stronger in your rotator cuff. If you’re a little bit weaker at first start off with a 5 pounder, but with a 10 pounder it gets a little bit heavier. So what Iyad’s going to do is bring his arm into a 90 degree angle and keep the shoulder at a 90 degree angle and you can see that the weight is going down straight through the forearm here right down. And so he’s going to do a rotation going outwards all the way and inwards all the way and he’s go…

Shoulder Impingement Pain Advanced Strengthening For A Weak Shoulder

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Hi my name is Iyad, I’m a Physiotherapist here at INSYNC PHYSIOTHERAPY. Today I’m going to show you an exercise that is particularly useful for any upper extremity rehabilitation or warm up. Some people in sports like Ultimate Frisbee, Rock Climbing, especially baseball or cricket where you involve a lot of throwing, this will be very very useful for it. Now the best thing about this is that you progress it on your own and you can modify it according to your needs. So all you need is a ball. The ball can have weight to it. That would probably help you by adding a strength component to this thing. Or if you’re not even injured and you just want a good warm up for the shoulder it can actually work really well for that. So the whole premise of this is that you are throwing the ball and catching it before it lands using a lot of the muscles of the shoulder blade and the rotator cuff to do so. So if you’re recovering from a strain and this is suitable for you and your stage of rehab then t…